EB 5 Visa Green Card

Under EB 5 Visa Green Card, the employment-based, fifth preference (EB-5) immigrant investor classification, individuals are eligible to apply for lawful permanent residence in the United States if they make the necessary investment in a commercial enterprise in the United States and create or, in certain circumstances, preserve 10 full-time jobs for qualified United States workers. This rule provides priority date retention to certain EB-5 investors, increases the required minimum investment amounts, reforms targeted employment area designations, and clarifies USCIS procedures for the removal of conditions on permanent residence.

We specialize in helping you get EB 5 visa Green Card. You can hire our eb 5 visa lawyers in California to get the green card. Before you begin, get to know Summary of the EB-5 final new rules

Summary of the EB-5 final new rules

This rule makes the following changes:

  • The rule clarifies that the priority date of a petition for classification as an investor is the date the petition is properly filed.
  • The rule clarifies that a petitioner with multiple approved immigrant petitions for classification as an investor is entitled to the earliest qualifying priority date;
  • The rule retains the 50 percent minimum investment differential between a targeted employment area (TEA) and a non-TEA instead of changing the differential to 25 percent as proposed, thereby increasing the minimum investment amount in a TEA from $500,000 to $900,000 (rather than $1.35 million, as DHS initially proposed);
  • The rule makes a technical correction to the inflation adjustment formula for the standard minimum investment amount and the high employment area investment amount, such that future inflation adjustments will be based on the initial investment amount set by Congress in 1990, rather than on the most recent inflation adjustment. Thus, for instance, the next inflation adjustment will be based on the initial minimum investment amount of $1,000,000 in 1990, rather than this rule’s minimum investment amount of $1,800,000, which is a rounded figure. This change better implements the intent of the proposed rule; it ensures that future inflation adjustments more accurately track inflation since 1990, rather than being based on rounded figures.
  • The rule modifies the original proposal that any city or town with a population of 20,000 or more may qualify as a TEA, to provide that only cities and towns with a population of 20,000 or more outside of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) may qualify as a TEA.
  • The rule modifies the application of the rule, such that amendments or supplements to any offering necessary to maintain compliance with applicable securities laws based upon the changes in this rule making will not independently result in denial or revocation of a petition, provided the petition meets certain criteria.
  • The rule also makes other minor non-substantive and clarifying changes.

This final rule makes the following major revisions to the EB-5 program regulations:

1. PRIORITY DATE RETENTION

The final rule authorizes certain EB-5 petitioners to retain the priority date of an approved EB-5 immigrant petition for use in connection with any subsequent EB-5 immigrant petition. Petitioners with approved immigrant petitions might need to file new petitions due to circumstances beyond their control (for instance, DHS might have terminated a regional center associated with the original petition), or might choose to do so for other reasons (for instance, due to business conditions a petitioner may seek to materially change aspects of his or her qualifying investment). This rule generally allows EB-5 petitioners to retain the priority date of a previously approved petition to avoid delays on immigrant visa processing associated with loss of a priority date. DHS believes that priority date retention may become increasingly important due to the strong possibility that the EB-5 category will remain oversubscribed for the foreseeable future.

2. INCREASES TO THE INVESTMENT AMOUNTS

DHS consulted with the Departments of State and Labor to increase the minimum investment amounts for all new EB-5 petitioners in this final rule. The increase will ensure that program requirements reflect the present-day dollar value of the investment amounts established by Congress in 1990. Specifically, the rule increases the standard minimum investment amount, which also applies to high employment areas, from $1 to $1.8 million. This change represents an adjustment for inflation from 1990 to 2015 as measured by the unadjusted Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U), an economic indicator that tracks the prices of goods and services in the United States. This rule also makes a technical correction to the inflation adjustment formula, so that future inflation adjustments will be based on the initial investment amount set by Congress in 1990, rather than on the most recent inflation adjustment.

For investors seeking to invest in a new commercial enterprise that will be principally doing business in a TEA, the proposed rule would have decreased the differential between TEA and non-TEA minimum investment amounts to 25 percent, thereby increasing the TEA minimum investment amount to $1.35 million, which is 75 percent of the increased standard minimum investment amount. However, based on a review of the comments, the final rule will retain the 50 percent differential, and only increase the minimum investment amount from $500,000 to $900,000.

In addition, the final rule sets the schedule for regular CPI-U-based adjustments in the standard minimum investment amount, and conforming adjustments to the TEA minimum investment amount, every 5 years, beginning 5 years from the effective date of these regulations.

3. TEA DESIGNATIONS

Congress authorized DHS to set a different minimum investment amount for investments made in TEAs, or “targeted employment areas” (i.e., rural areas and areas of high unemployment). The final rule reforms the TEA designation process to ensure consistency in TEA adjudications and better ensure that TEA designations more closely adhere to congressional intent. Specifically, the final rule eliminates the ability of a state to designate certain geographic and political subdivisions as high unemployment areas; instead, DHS will make such designations directly, using standards described in more detail elsewhere in this final rule. DHS believes these changes will help address inconsistencies between and within states in designating high unemployment areas, and better ensure that the reduced investment threshold is reserved for areas experiencing sufficiently high levels of unemployment, as Congress intended.

DHS is making three changes from the NPRM, with respect to TEA designations. First, DHS is modifying its proposal on high unemployment areas to include only cities and towns with a population of 20,000 or more outside of MSAs as a specific and separate area that may qualify as a TEA.  By contrast, the NPRM proposed to allow any city or town with high unemployment and a population of 20,000 or more to qualify as a TEA, regardless of whether located within an MSA. Under the current regulatory scheme, TEA designations are not available at the city or town level, unless a state designates the city or town as a high unemployment area and provides evidence of such designation to a prospective EB-5 investor for submission with the Form I-526. DHS recognizes the proposal was inadvertently over-inclusive because DHS intended the proposal to provide non-rural cities and towns located outside of MSAs additional methods to qualify as a TEA, but the proposal would have allowed cities and towns with high unemployment and a population of 20,000 or more located within MSAs to qualify. DHS did not necessarily intend to permit cities and towns within MSAs to qualify or to create any new distinctions between cities and towns of various populations within MSAs. The final rule modifies the proposal to include only cities and towns with a population of 20,000 or more outside of MSAs as a specific and separate area that may qualify as a TEA based on high unemployment. 

Second, DHS is finalizing a technical change to removing the mention of “geographic and political subdivisions” for special designations. Because DHS proposed and is finalizing the census tract process for special designations, references to other subdivisions are no longer required.

Third, DHS is making an additional technical change to the description of special designation TEAs proposed in the NPRM, replacing “contiguous” as it is used to describe additional census tracts that can be added to the census tract(s) in which the NCE is principally doing business, with “directly adjacent.” This technical change was made to mirror the description of special designation TEAs elsewhere in the rule and to minimize confusion to the public, as the term “contiguous” could be read to include census tracts beyond those directly adjacent to the census tract(s) in which the NCE is principally doing business.

4. REMOVAL OF CONDITIONS

The final rule revises the regulations to clarify that derivative family members must file their own petitions to remove conditions on their permanent residence when they are not included in a petition to remove conditions filed by the principal investor. In addition, the rule improves the adjudication process for removing conditions by providing flexibility in interview locations and updates the regulation to conform to the current process for issuing permanent resident cards. 

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